Biting Midge by Anders Damgaard posted by ianbrooks.me Spider (araneae) by Anders Damgaard posted by ianbrooks.me Beetle (Latridiidae) by Anders Damgaard posted by ianbrooks.me Erythraeidae - a parasitic mite larva on a Fulgoromorpha nymph by Anders Damgaard posted by ianbrooks.me millipede (Polydesmida) by Anders Damgaard posted by ianbrooks.me Beetle (Latridiidae) by Anders Damgaard posted by ianbrooks.me male wedge-shaped beetle (Rhipiphoridae) by Anders Damgaard posted by ianbrooks.me rove beetle (Staphylinidae, Paederinae) by Anders Damgaard posted by ianbrooks.me Caddisfly (Trichoptera) by Anders Damgaard posted by ianbrooks.me Pseudoscorpion by Anders Damgaard posted by ianbrooks.me

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ianbrooks:

Amber Inclusions by Anders Damgaard

With all this discussion recently surrounding the ethics of manipulating DNA in an effort to resurrect lost species, it seems appropriate that we take a look back in time at the vessels for our future T-Rexes and (fingers crossed~!) Giant Ground Sloths. Until that glorious day when we will ride atop the backs of huge beavers (it was a thing! Science up), admire the beauty of these amber-encased insects, forever looking out at us through a layer of several million years.

Photog: Flickr / Website / Blog

Friendly reminder that amber is one hypercool plant material; it is the fossilized resin of ancient trees. And it’s not just animals and insects that prehistoric amber has trapped for modern scientists to study, it has also trapped pollen, plant parts, and other goodies that help in reconstructing ancient landscapes. ~AR

(via setbabiesonfire)